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Desperate for good news now that the Hs2 Hybrid bill is only days away from passing 3rd reading, the anti Hs2 mob have fallen hook, line & sinker for the latest rubbish from Andrew Gilligan in the Sunday Telegraph.

It’s classic Gilligan, lite, trite and s**te. He rehashes old news, adds a dash of mystery with a supposed ‘secret’ report and lets loose another useless piece of scaremongering masquerading as investigative journalism.

Let’s have a look at his claims. What (if anything) in the article is actually new? Nothing at all. The supposedly “secret” report is over a year old and it actually talks about issues around track geometry that have been known about for years. Gilligoon quotes Prof Peter Woodward of Herriott Watt university about “critical track velocity effects” and “significant issues” with track instability. And?

Here’s a link to the Herriott Watt website and their railway research department. The issues with high speed track design are so “secret” that, err, the university has a course for students to study it! Woodward’s work into high speed track design featured on the BBC as far back as January 2013.

So, far from being “news” Gilligan is (as usual) rehashing his own old stories. He first published this same scaremongering way back in February 2012! Here’s what he said then. As you can see, it’s almost a carbon copy of his “new” revelations – including the tired old stuff about Rayleigh waves (which were discussed in great detail in Parliament as long ago as 2011).

Once again Gilligoon proves just how crap a journalist he really is. He recycles an old story from 2012 & hopes no-one will notice! There’s nothing new here at all, let alone anything that’s ‘news’. Like most of the stuff Gilligan writes there’s only one place to file this latest rubbish. The bin.

UPDATE at 20:42

Like most stories, this one has spread. Gilligoon’s story has continued to implode. Blogger Tim Fenton aka @zelo_street has picked up & expanded on the story – as has a  respected technical expert (Chris Baker)